3-D Snowflakes

#mwisdmatters

It has been unusually warm here in north Texas. I’m not complaining mind you but I’m craving a little Christmas weather.

The kind of weather where a pot of chili with cornbread takes the chill off your bones. The kind of weather that makes cider and hot chocolate taste good. Sweater weather. So time for a little snow artwork.

My good friend Billie Slater used to bring her Cadets into the building singing…”Pray for snow….pray for snow….” in their best Native American chant rhythm. Well I’m not quite up to that vocally, so we are making snowflakes. Big 3-D snowflakes. I found a very clear tutorial here on the wonderful blog, One Less Headache. Add good instructions plus a sprinkling of science and math and voila, 3-D snowflakes.

 

I have my winter board done too for a little extra snow mojo.

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Let’s get this straight…..not sleet…not ice..I want snow, the big fluffy kind you make snow ice cream with.

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Front and Center

group 2Every 4th grade child wants to draw whatever it is we are drawing (excuse the Texan phrase here) smack dab in the middle of the paper. So, in this simple 4th grade exercise, the goal was to place half our main subject, in this case a snowman, off the plane of the picture. Asymmetry vs. Symmetry.

We watched a clip of Olaf, from Frozen, (Please don’t stop reading, I know, I know…that song!) and talked about how he MOVED around in the frame. We talked about the phrase “dead center” and how that placement for your main subject can be kind of…well…can be…..frozen. Sorry.

duoWe talked about the mystery of what is off the edge of the page, but is implied to be there. The undiscovered country. An invisible world that is just around the corner, out of sight. That implied part of the image can be so intriguing and make your composition much more interesting to look at.

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Another highlight for my 4th graders was to use oil pastel on this artwork on a blue background. Lovely, messy pastels used on their side for the black border and large areas. Pastel on point for the outline and fine details of the snowman. Swirling snowflakes and a snowbank finished our composition. More fun than a snowball fight on the playground…well ok maybe not. But fun was had by all.